BOMBING OF ST PAULS

20 May, 2020

Like many of you we have been exploring the outer reaches of i-player and the TV schedule for interesting programmes.  We have been watching Dan Snow’s series on BBC2 (still on i-player) about archaeology of WWII which has now come to an end.  Tomorrow night at 1930 (7:30pm) it is replaced by War Walks which covers the bombing of St Pauls Cathedral.  We will certainly be watching that.

Hope you are all getting by with the lockdown.  The slight relaxing of the rules is welcome.  Take care.


A SHORT WALK THROUGH HAMMERSMITH AND SHEPHERDS BUSH

12 May, 2020

During the present restrictions I’m taking walks for exercise but also hoping to discover more, as I walk, about local history.

Today I’m starting out from home in Brackenbury Village, walking briskly through side streets and making sure to keep my distance from other people according to the rules.

I’m going up Iffley Road and noticing that work is commencing again on No. 41 which is being refurbished and renovated for up-to-date studio space. When I first moved to the area I was stunned by the wonderful

Iffley Road Mission
c/r Historic England

which is in a 15th century Venetian Gothic style. Quite unexpected in an ordinary residential road. I’ve learned that the original Mission Hall was built in 1883-4 by the architect H.R. Gough before the rest of the street and is Grade 2 listed. There is a blue plaque to the scenic artist John Campbell who worked here. Sadly most of the façade is at present hidden behind scaffolding but you can see the very top from the road. I can’t wait for the work to be finished!

I’m now heading down Sycamore Gardens towards Goldhawk Road. I really like the almshouses with their pleasant outside space. What I’ve learnt is that Sycamore House was built in 1950 and renovated in 2012. It is supported by what was originally Dr Edwards’s and Bishop King’s Fulham Charity and is now Hammersmith United Charities. John King was Bishop of London from 1611 to 1621. In his will he left £20 to be bestowed upon the poor of the parish at the discretion of his wife. The first distribution of “a twopenny loafe of breed and a pice of befe to eleven poor people of Fulham and fourteen poor people of Hammersmith” was made on Easter Eve 1623.

On I go across Goldhawk Road and then left along Lime Grove. The very impressive façade on the left was originally that of

Hammersmith Bath House

Hammersmith Public Baths. The full name is still proudly displayed on the façade. Apparently it opened in 1906. The website “Finding Lidos: Dive into lost Lidos” tells me that “the walls were lined with glazed tiles and the bath was converted into a public hall on some occasions often staging boxing matches.” During the first World War it served as a public food kitchen. It is now apparently converted into residential flats.

On the right are Gaumont Terrace and Gainsborough Court. I’m pleased that the original names remain from the film studios that were here from 1915. Alfred Hitchcock made “The 39 Steps” here in 1935 and David Lean and Michael Powell worked here. When I lived in Shepherds Bush I remember the impressive Gaumont Towers which dominated the surrounding streets. They were demolished in 1993. I’m surprised that I don’t remember that happening as it must have been a very noisy and dramatic affair!

Now across Uxbridge Road and left down Frithville Gardens. There are tall trees in the distance at the end of the road which look quite promising. Yes…it is a park… Hammersmith Park (although it is in Shepherds Bush!). There is a small rock garden with a bridge and a pool. An unexpectedly calm space with beautiful trees and plants. The notice board tells me that it

Photograph of White City Japanese British Exhibition

Japanese British Exhibition

was the site of the 1908 Olympic Games and the Japan British Exhibition in 1910. The rock garden is on the site of a traditional Japanese garden and it still has a Japanese feel to it. The avenue of traditional stone lanterns is unfamiliar to me: apparently it was added in 2018 together with an authentic Japanese gateway by the Japan Society, the Embassy of Japan and various local businesses and Japanese companies. The original gateway from 1910 is now in Kew Gardens as part of a Garden of Harmony. That gateway was restored in 1996 before creation of the Japanese landscape around it at Kew.

Just around the corner is the QPR football stadium. Maybe I’ll go back home another way past the stadium and down Bloemfontein Road. The South African street names are interesting: most people think that they relate to the British Commonwealth and Franco British exhibitions of 1908.

I’ve enjoyed my walk. As well as appreciating being out of doors I have learnt quite a bit about the local area. I’m sure that there is much that I have missed and so I will be walking that way again soon!

Susan Richards

II – POSTSCRIPT

Quick as a flash these old photos came to hand, hope they add some flavour if not colour.

Iffley Road

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lime Grove


THE APRIL QUICK QUIZ

7 May, 2020

Those who read our latest Newsletter (149 Spring) may not have had all the answers to our quiz so here they are.  How did you do? Should we try this again?


THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN FULHAM AND HAMMERSMITH & THE POSTCODE ANOMALY

2 May, 2020

An article written by our Chairman for the Hammersmith and Fulham Historic Buildings Group.

Fulham was inhabited in Roman times, probably until the early 5th century AD. Archaeological excavations in the late 1980s uncovered a late 5th/6th century Saxon settlement on the site of the former Manbre sugar works at the end of Winslow Road, also the remains of Parr Ditch, which is the historic boundary between Fulham and Hammersmith. Incidentally, this was the site of Brandenburg House and its grounds, the home of Queen Caroline, the divorced consort of King George IV, who died here in 1821.
After the Dark Ages the first recorded date for this location is AD704/5 when the Bishop of the East Saxons (London) acquired a place called Fulanham from the Bishop of Hereford. It included Hammersmith and is virtually identical to the present Borough, Parr Ditch being the common boundary. The ditch was a branch of Stamford Brook that flowed down Brook Green, hence the name. After crossing Hammersmith Road, it became the boundary between Fulham and Hammersmith.
Originally the boundary was slightly south of the present day statue of Capability Brown. In the river wall may be seen the brick archway outlet of the brook and above it a stone bearing the initials HP and FP, pictured above, and the boundary line between Hammersmith Parish and Fulham Parish. The ditch was culverted as a sewer during the 19th century. This would tend to indicate that before the 8th century Fulham and Hammersmith were two separate districts but by the time of the Bishop’s acquisition the two districts had been united.
The boundary has slightly shifted over the years but basically runs along Chancellors Road, Yeldham Road, south of Margravine Gardens, west of Gliddon Road cutting through the former St Paul’s School playing fields and the school itself, then meeting the Hammersmith Road opposite Brook Green. It then turns right along the centre of Hammersmith Road ending at Addison Bridge. The other side of the railway line is Kensington. The railway follows the line of the culverted Counters Creek – also known as Billingwell Ditch – and where it enters the Thames known as Chelsea Creek (now Chelsea Harbour). Counters Creek separated Hammersmith from Kensington, and Fulham from Chelsea.
In 1857 London was a post town but due to its rapid expansion was divided up into many separate postal districts, hence SW, W, EC, N, etc. Fulham was designated as being SW, Hammersmith as W. In 1889, the Post Office decided that the part of Fulham north of Crabtree Lane would get a better delivery service from the Western District office that had its HQ at Paddington. This caused much controversy in Fulham and the Vestry Clerk wrote to the Postmaster General complaining. The Post Office was striking out Fulham on letters and writing Hammersmith. In 1906, Sir William Bull, MP for Hammersmith put a question to the Postmaster General in the House of Commons as Fulham people didn’t like being told they lived in Hammersmith. This was to no avail. The same applied to Fulham residents being told they lived in West Kensington, W. The number suffixes were added to London postal areas in 1917 to increase efficiency of delivery; it has been said to be due to the temporary employment of women postal workers due to the shortage of men because of the Great War.
The Office of National Statistics, in its Postcode Look-up User Guide 2011, states categorically that ‘Postcode areas are defined and used by Royal Mail for the purpose of efficient mail delivery and have no relationship with administrative and electoral areas’. So although Charing Cross Hospital is styled Hammersmith, W6 it is located in Fulham.
Keith Whitehouse,
Chairman
Fulham & Hammersmith Historical Society


MORE NOT GOING OUT!

29 April, 2020

Something for everyone, hope this provides some ideas.

More Personal Memories of the Borough

Last week I received a generous offer to our Members of a free pdf copy of a privately published Family History.  It centres on the Lally family living in Carthew Road & St Peter’s Grove Hammersmith from 1914 until 1944. Brackenbury and West Kensington Central Schools, churches and youth organisations all feature.  Some of our members helped provide background material. The depression and wartime spirit have a message for our current situation. It provides a narrative of the times that is both fascinating and instructive let me have your email address if you would like a copy.  The author has a few hardback copies at £30.

Whilst on the subject of personal histories you may have missed two books in our publications:

Ladybirds on the Wall

Ladybirds on the Wall

Memoirs of a London Childhood by Dorothy L Ash born at Anselm Road in 1899 covers her first 33 years living in Fulham.

Ladybirds on the Wall by Barbara Denny describes a life lived in West Kensington (North End)  from 1920-1940.

As well as personal, indeed social, history both books give an insight into life in West London at those times and have a nice style of prose, the second being written by a well known local reporter.

Jigsaw Therapy and History

These innovative interactive jigsaws have been put together by our local Archivist Kath Shawcross. Quite good fun and of course a reminder that all have significant histories. Challenge the grandkids or neighbours (electronically) to complete in a faster time than you and also to find out their history.

Fulham Bridge

Fulham Bridge

Hammersmith Bridge
Fulham Bridge
Fulham Palace

We have only a few Hammersmith Bridge books left but plenty of Fulham Bridge see Publications.

 

Video History

For something more national and on a grander scale here is a brief video of Julian Humphrys’ Top Ten Castles.

Finally BBC4 tomorrow Thursday 7:30pm Museums in Quarantine does a virtual tour of the British Museum.


TUESDAY 3 MARCH 7:30PM ST CLEMENTS CHURCH HALL – AGM AND LONDON BRIDGE AND ITS HOUSES

26 February, 2020

London Bridge

On Tuesday we hold our 49th AGM; a chance to have your say, vote in the committee and hear the reports. We also have a talk from Dorian Gerhold about London Bridge and its houses. In history terms this is  bridging the middle ages to Victorian times. Should be a fascinating talk.  Don’t miss it. All welcome £3 to non-members. see our latest newsletter for details of venue and transport.

 


TUESDAY, 15TH OCTOBER, 7.30PM AT ST MATTHEW’S CHURCH

13 October, 2019

THE LILLIE ENCLAVE: A HISTORY OF BRITISH INDUSTRY, ART, CRAFT AND FUN WITHIN A QUARTER OF A MILE.

Map of The Lillie Enclave

An illustrated talk on this interesting part of Fulham centred on
Empress Place adjoining the now demolished Earls Court Exhibition Centre. This talk is by Ann Kutek, who was involved in the fight to save Earls Court, and is still fighting to save the Victorian houses in Empress Place from demolition. Ann has spent most of her life a stones throw from either side of “Counters Creek”.
Come and hear this talk on a lesser known part of Fulham.
Venue: St Matthews church, on Wandsworth Bridge Road, corner of Rosebury Road SW6 2TX
By Bus: 295 & 28 both pass the door, stop TK Oakbury Road is the nearest.
By tube: to Fulham Broadway and catch one of the buses above on Harwood Road.
FREE (£3 for non-members that includes refreshmenst)