HISTORY AT OUR FEET

5 September, 2018

We all travel around London heading to our destination and probably not noticing the history on the pavements of our streets. Much of course is modern and ever changing. The Victorian pavements clearly had stone paving as can be seen where there are still coal-hole covers set into the stone. Elsewhere the concrete slabs have taken over. These coal-hole covers themselves vary from the generic mass produced versions to those bearing names of local purveyors. These are all from Fulham streets in a very small area.
Coal Hole London

Coal Hole London

Coal Hole Mansfield

Coal Hole Mansfield

There are also markings on kerb stones: these in Munster Road are believed to mark the pitches of the now defunct street market. They consist of a series of arrow head inscriptions about 15 feet apart with a number inbetween.

Kerb Munster Road

Kerb Munster Road

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kerb - Hammersmith TerraceSome are more difficult to understand such as this one on Hammersmith Terrace we saw when viewing St Peter’s square and Black Lion Lane area earlier in the year.

or this in Clareville Street Kensington

Kerb Clareville St

Kerb Clareville St

– possibly long gone utilities?

More modern are the utility manhole covers; for example you can see the morphing of GPO to Post Office Telephones, British Telecom, BT and Open Reach. The water companies show a similar pattern of change from local utilities to a modern day giant company.

This boundary stone doesn’t seem to relate to known land owners so there is a story to discover here.

Boundary Stone

Boundary Stone

 

 

Postbox Warwick Gardens

Postbox Warwick Gardens

 

 

 

Of course there are the obvious such as this post box in Warwick Gardens Kensington

Gate in Bloom Park Rd

Gate in Bloom Park Rd

or this original gate on Bloom Park Road  although sadly not many of these are left. The original lock plate is still in place containing the mark of its Glasgow makers.  Britain was a very connected society even then.

So our London streets can reveal their history even on a walk to work or the shops.

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BROMPTON CEMETERY

2 June, 2017

TUESDAY 6 JUNE, 6.30PM
The forecast is for a bright evening so why not join us on a
VISIT TO BROMPTON CEMETERY Led by Keith Whitehouse.
During the 19th century, with the growth of London,
churchyards were becoming full so enterprising business
men decided to build private cemeteries laid out as parks.
Brompton was opened in 1840 and included catacombs. It
was consecrated by the Bishop of London. The first burial
was Emma Shaw from Fulham. Many famous people are
buried here as were residents of Fulham and
Hammersmith. Emmeline Pankhurst, Richard Tauber,
Constant Lambert and Albert Smith of Mont Blanc fame
to name just a few. There are many fine monuments
including one designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones. One of the finest cemeteries in London.
Meet outside the entrance in Old Brompton Road.
Bus: 74 and 430 stop outside.
Tube: West Brompton (next to cemetery)
FREE


THE BIRD FAMILY OF HAMMERSMITH

3 April, 2017

TUESDAY 11 APRIL, 7:30PM
We had a lively AGM re-electing the Committee and officers and were treated to the postponed talk on “Mr Albert Smith’s Ascent of Mont Blanc” by our chairman. Amazingly this doctor cum dentist and adventurer found it better to run theatre shows of his adventures; becoming popular in the highest circles including the Queen.

Keith also did a succesful talk on the postal services in Fulham and Hammersmith at the West London Local History Conference. He and our secretary sold 80 books so a great success.

Our next event will be Jacina Bird talking about her forebears who during the 19th century built much of Hammersmith including St Peter’s Church and the stone piers of the first Hammersmith bridge. The talk will be supplemented by slides and items from family collection.

So do join us for what promises to be an interesting talk at 7:30pm in St Clements Hall Fulham Palace Road near the corner of Crabtree Lane details of buses etc in the Newsletter


Party in the Park (Ravenscourt) 24 July

20 July, 2014

For those in the Ravenscourt Park and Askew Road areas of Hammersmith, the Party in the Park on Thursday presents an opportunity to learn more about local history from Caroline Macmillan. Sounds like fun too. See this link for details.