THE HISTORY OF BYZANTIUM – BY ROBIN PIERSON

12 February, 2020
Byzantine Frieze

Byzantine Frieze

We had a fantastic and fascinating talk last Tuesday about how the history of this enigmatic period of the Roman story is brought to life through the medium of podcasts. Robin Pierson researches, writes and performs these pieces to the microphone and most of the nearly 200 are freely available on the web with some supporting material on the website https://thehistoryofbyzantium.com .
You missed an excellent talk but can dive into podcasts right now look it up.
Don’t forget the next event is our AGM with a talk about the Houses on the Original London Bridge on 3 March at 7:30pm see Newsletter for details.


THE PRE-RAPHAELITES & WILLIAM MORRIS

17 January, 2020

For those who joined our visit to Emery Walkers House or to Leighton House you may be interested to catch the following:

  1.  The National Portrait Gallery’s exhibition the pre-raphaelite sisters is due to finish on 26 Jan.  It is well worth a visit for the historical context and the background of these ladies who were often talented artists too as well as muses (even if you are not keen on the paintings!). Catch it while you can.
  2. Chanel 4’s George Clark’s Old House New Home a recent episode covering an arts and crafts home near Croydon featured Emery Walkers’ House and the William Morris wallpaper archive and some block printing. This is on All 4 not sure for how long.

CHARLES DICKENS APPEAL AND MORE

2 April, 2019

Charles Dickens is in the news currently as a lost original portrait has been discovered there is an appeal by the Charles Dickens Museum for funds please check out the link.

Did you know that the great author had links to to our borough.  The Guardian says:      In 1847 Dickens had founded a “home for homeless women” with his friend the wealthy philanthropist Baroness Burdett-Coutts. With typical energy he found the premises – Urania Cottage in London’s Shepherd’s Bush – and then flung himself into organising every detail of it, from the food to the flower garden, and the piano around which the women would gather for wholesome evening entertainment.

On a sadder note his son also Charles was born at Furnivals Inn in Holborn, London, the first child of Charles Dickens and his then-wife Catherine Hogarth. Charles Dickens Jr. Died 20 June 1896 (aged 59 ) Fulham, London, England.

The area also features in his work – The mystery of Edwin Drood has a great illustration by Sir Luke Fildes of people in a boat passing by Fulham church and bridge.

Fulham Church and Bridge from the Thames

Fulham Church and Bridge

Scanned image and text by Philip V. Allingham

LONDON – 2000 years of History

2 April, 2019

Just a quick note to say I watched this programme on My5 (channel 5’s version of i-player).  It is a rapid canter through loads of history but no less interesting for that.  The joy of course is that there are very few adverts when watching this way.  Worth a look there are only 4 episodes.


WINTER ACTIVITIES

21 September, 2017

Summer saw us having a truly revelatory visit to Buscot Park the home of Lord Farringdon with previously unseen drawings and documents by Charlotte Sulivan, a stand at the Parson’s Green Fair and summer Garden Party.

Now for the Winter programme we have two splendid talks and a show and tell evening with a Christmas Party in December. Full details are in the latest Newsletter here are the dates:
26 Sep 7:00pm The Development of the Peterborough Estate (Lion Houses) a talk by Peter Kulpa. Jesse Milne Centre Fulham Palace.
10 Oct 7:00pm A Proud Unthankefull City? – London & the English Civil Wars A Talk by David Flintham. Jesse Milne Centre Fulham Palace.
15 November 7:30pm Show and Tell – following last year’s success, a chance to talk about your and other’s pieces of history. At St Clements Church Hall, Fulham Palace Road.
11 December 7:00pm Members’ Christmas Buffet at Pryors Bank, Bishop’s Park Fulham.
Do note the two talks are slightly earlier and in the Palace Education Centre to ensure the best facilities.

To all those interested in our local history there can be no greater event than an archaeological dig. At our own Fulham Palace a search for the documented Dovecote and possible earlier medieval buildings will begin in October but your help is needed please look at the website and persuade your friends and local businesses to contribute. The Society will be making a significant donation but lots of help is needed. We eagerly await news of whatever they uncover.


OUR DOUBLE NELSON in July

6 August, 2015

On 2 July a sizeable group from the FHHS and Fulham Palace heard a fascinating illustrated talk by our medical and naval historian Jane Bowden-Dan in the splendid facility that is the Jessie Milne Education Centre at Fulham Palace. We were enlightened about the conditions on board Naval ships at the time in peace and war. This included the shocking statistics on deaths from sickness and injury and how scurvy was defeated with fruit. We learned of Nelson’s career and his relationship with Lady Hamilton and of their brief home together at Merton before leaving for his final campaign that culminated in his death at Trafalgar.

As a bonus a small group went to visit Morden Hall Park on the 18 July. It is a National Trust site that includes the location of Nelson’s long demolished home. There was little trace of the building but one could understand the attraction of such a pleasant location not too far from London. The group were conducted by a National Trust guide.


A PREVIEW OF SOLDIERS AND SUFFRAGETTES

5 August, 2015

The photography of CHRISTINA BROOM
Sue Pierson visited the exhibition and enjoyed it so much she wanted to share this review with you and encourage you to come to the talk and visit the Docklands Museum.

If you have never been to the Museum of London in the Docklands, you have missed a treat. Housed in a Grade One warehouse, it chronicles the history of London through the importance of the river. But until 1 November there is an added attraction in the photography of Christina Broom who lived in Chelsea and finally in Munster Road, Fulham. She is regarded as the first female press photographer, admired by royalty and respected by soldiers and suffragettes. Her photographs are largely informal and are all outside. She was a small woman but carried her bulky equipment on public transport or walked it along roads. She was above all interested in people and wasn’t too bothered about backgrounds.
Of particular interest to us in Fulham are her pictures of the Church pageant in 1909 and the Army pageant of 1910 both held in the grounds of Fulham Palace. There is a wonderful snippet of film of her wandering among the 1914 Boat Race crew at Putney no doubt looking for a good angle for her photo!
Christina died in 1939 aged 75 a few days after she had been enjoying her hobby of fishing in Margate. Her daughter Winnie acted as her mother’s assistant. She gave over 300 negatives to the Museum of London in 1945 spurred on by Queen Mary, herself a keen photographer, who said that they were ’for posterity where people may go and look at prints when they have more leisure.’ Last year the Museum acquired the remaining photos and associated material.
Take a helpful magnifying glass from the rack on your way in. If you are looking at the rest of the Museum, allow plenty of time. You won’t be disappointed!

http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/christinabroom