ART AGAIN CONNECTING TO HISTORY

29 August, 2020

Again venturing forth a visit to the Tate Britain Gallery (Buses 211 or 14/414 then 360) produced two more surprising connections.  We walked through the 1540 to 1890 Collection Route where we found many Turners and Hogarths amongst the Constables, Stubbs and others when we noticed an oil by John Linnell in 1811-12 entitled Kensington Gravel Pits! This reminds us all just how different our area was only 200 years ago.  Investigation reveals that there was a hamlet of this name roughly where Notting Hill Gate is now this map from British Vision may help.  Of  course much of our area was market gardens and nurseries at this time.

Labourers in gravel pits

Further into the gallery we strayed into British Art 1930 to the present and again were amazed to see Hanging Gardens of Hammersmith No 1.  Having never connected Hammersmith with Babylon this deserved further investigation. Victor Pasmore was a conscientious objector during WWII and this was produced 1944-7 at 16 Hammersmith Terrace and is the view down his garden to the Thames.

As a result of last week’s post we have been notified of a talk on William Morris by Maxine Morgan 1:30 to 4:00PM on 12 September at William Morris Meeting Rooms, 267 The Broadway, Wimbledon, SW19.  Face Masks are required and social distancing measures will be in place.

 

 

 


EMERY WALKER TRUST

8 July, 2020

No apologies for returning to a jewel in Hammersmith’s history.

Emery Walker’s House has launched a series of online talks and tours to keep people in touch with the Arts and Crafts home at 7 Hammersmith Terrace.

Stunning photo courtesy of Emery Walker Trust

Hammersmith Terrace from river

What a stunning photograph! Courtesy of the Trust. Here are the dates and subjects.

The Doves Press

July 9th at 3pm

The Doves Press was the most influential twentieth century typeface to emerge from the Arts and Crafts movement.  Yet the two friends who created it fell out spectacularly.  This talk will tell the story of the creation of the Press, its loss and eventual recovery.

Past Residents of Hammersmith Terrace

July 30th at 3pm

Hammersmith Terrace is a Georgian terrace of seventeen houses which boasts three blue plaques. But that barely scratches the surface of its notable residents. Meet eleven more extraordinary people who lived here.

In Search of Emery Walker with Simon Loxley September 19th at 3pm

Author and graphic designer Simon Loxley discusses his latest book Emery Walker: Arts, Crafts and a World in Motion. Simon will paint a picture of Walker, his work and his world, a man who professionally and socially seemed to ‘know everyone’. He will re-examine what has been written about him, and include his research of archive material, much of which came from Walker’s home at 7 Hammersmith Terrace, where he lived from 1903 to 1933.

 Book your places here emerywalker.org.uk/copy-of-events.

Emery Walker’s House has been closed since March, so their usual visitor numbers and income from tickets and giftshop purchases for this period have plummeted from 90% bookings to zero. The Trust has made available a virtual and guided tours of the house and riverside garden on their website. Emerywalker.org.uk also has a wealth of information on the house and the people who lived there, and an online shop selling embroidery kits, handmade gift cards and other items so do drop in for a virtual visit during closure.

The tours are free, and the interactive talks are via Zoom by donation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


RECENT EVENTS

25 June, 2018

    15 MAY ST PETER’S CHURCH & SQUARE


On a very balmy evening we gathered at the church and had a look inside. We heard what Pevsner had to say about it and a little of its history. It must have been idyllic before the predations of motor transport. The group then walked around the square noting the splendid buildings and even a small terrace in similar style that was built to complete the square when the Commodore Cinema was demolished. Diverting into some of the less grand streets it was interesting to note the number of corner shops that have now been converted to homes.
Thence underneath the roaring A4 to wander along Hammersmith Terrace noting its former residents which include A P Herbert and Emery Walker (list). Again a number of former shops were evident in the houses opposite, a reminder just how local shopping was despite the presence of King Street so near. The evening was concluded, for some at least, with refreshment at the Black Lion.

    29 MAY WATTS GALLERY

An extra event was arranged to see the Cecil French Bequest to LBHF of pre-Raphaelite works before the exhibition closed at the end of the month. Four cars worth of members braved the rather damp weather to journey down to Guildford. The weather improved soon after arrival and a good exhibition was complemented by a great lunch in the cafe. Some visited the Church and the Watts studio and we were all met by a wall of water as we headed home. Nevertheless a good visit and well worth seeing as the works may not be exhibited again for some time.