20 February, 2018

Another terrific talk to start the year.

In 1136 a book appeared that was to change history – literally. Geoffrey of Monmouth’s ”History of the Kings of Britain” detailed a fundamentily ‘British History’ that was accepted as genuine for 400 and more years. There was no place in it for the Roman Conquest of Britain, or for Londinium, capital of a province of the Roman Empire. Just that London had been ‘New Troy’, older than Rome and ruled by independent British kings like Lud, who built the city’s walls. Only in the 16th century did London historians question this story. With access to classical texts rediscovered during the Renaissance and spread by printing, and with the natives of the newly discovered America’s as models for an understanding of the ‘Ancient Britons’ described by Julius Caesar, they were better placed to interpret the nature of Roman London. Rebuilding works after the Great Fire revealed relics of this earlier London, and they were collected, recorded and discussed by antiquarians. Yet the popular belief that London was an already ancient city before the arrival of the Romans was hard to ignore.

John Clark was formerly Keeper of the Medieval Department at the Museum of London. Now retired he is Professor Emeritus. Do come along and here this fascinating, illustrated talk.

St Clements Church Hall, Fulham Palace Road, SW6
FREE (Non-members £3 includes refreshments)



3 April, 2016

Sorry for the lack of posts recently but here is a catch up.

Palace Foreshores
We had a superb talk from Natalie Cohen from the Museum of London Archaeology about the work at the shoreline to record our past. It was both an enthusiastic and fascinating presentation do check the Newsletter for a fuller writeup.138 Spring 2016

The AGM will be on Tuesday at 7:30pm in St Clements Church Hall, again full details in the newsletter.

Tuesday 10 May at 7:30pm
Simon Inglis, who edits the Played in Britain series for English Heritage, offers a lively illustrated lecture on the surprisingly rich and varied sporting and recreational heritage of Fulham and Hammersmith. Here is athletics as described by Wilkie Collins at Lillie Bridge, billiards on Fulham Palace Road, skittles with AP Herbert at the Black Lion and a plasterer called Joseph Bickley, whose ‘secret formula’ had racket-wielding aristocrats queuing at his workshop on Lillie Road. We shall hear how a Scottish engineer nipped between Stevenage Road and Fulham Road during the summer of 1905 to build new stadiums for rivals Fulham and Chelsea, and how a squash court in
the grounds of Latymer School was one of seven sports-related buildings listed by English Heritage in 2014-15 as a result of Inglis’s latest, award winning book, Played in London – Charting the Heritage of a City at Play. https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/played-inlondon/. Also to be revealed is how, in 1878, a field in Fulham hosted what is thought to have been the first sporting event ever to have taken place under floodlights in Britain. If not interested in sport, don’t be put off. The evening’s focus is on architecture and social history, with some capital fun guaranteed.
Talk will be held in St Clements Church Hall (see details above under AGM)
Tuesday 14 June 7pm
Fulham as well as a palace has a prison, some of the buildings still survive. We will look at the site of the wooden Fulham Bridge and the ferry crossing, where the first Mercedes cars in Britain were built, the temperance billiard hall now a pub, the Fulham war memorial garden where a plaque commemorates a Victoria Cross winner, the surviving kiln of Fulham Pottery, the road that gave its name to a lavatory system and much more. A walk not to be missed. Led by Keith Whitehouse.
Meet outside the Eight Bells pub, 89 Fulham High Street. near the river at 7pm
(one of Fulham’s oldest pubs that has stood here for over 400 years) and perhaps a drink afterwards.
Sunday 24th July 3-5pm
Come and enjoy tea, cakes and conversation at 48 Peterborough Road, SW6 3EB on Sunday 24th July from 3 to 5pm the home of Sue and Lance Pierson. If it is fine we can spill into the garden. Parking is free. Parson’s Green is the nearest station a 10 to 15 minute walk away. Buses 28 and 295 go along the Wandsworth Bridge Road which is 5 minutes walk away. Number 48 is 2 doors from the junction with Daisy Lane.

Latest Newsletter Winter/Spring 2014

1 January, 2014

All members will have received the latest newsletter through the post it gives details of recent events covered in this blog and publishes  the forthcoming events and meetings.

Newsletter 132

Forthcoming events include:

Tuesday 14 Jan at 1930

Michael Hill gives illustrated lecture on The Fulham Union 1845-1899 the Fulham Union workhouse and infirmary became Hammersmith hospital and Charing Cross Hospital so lots of local interest.  This is a Free talk.

Saturday 22 Feb at 1130

Visit to the Museum of the order of St John, Clerkenwell. There is a small charge for the visit.

Sunday 30 Mar 1430

Walk Around the Moat of Fulham Palace with  our chairman Keith Whitehouse who directed the revealing first archaeological dig of 1972-73.  A later dig financed by the Lottery revealed the bridge and gothic arch at the entrance in Bishop’s Avenue. The walk should be an interesting taster of things to come as the small charge of £5 will be used to support the new 2014 dig in the grounds. See Newsletter

Do  look up the details in the newsletter.