FULHAM PALACE MOAT WALK

16 July, 2016

Sun 17 July, 2pm
Moat Walk for the Festival of Archaeology
As part of the Festival of Archaeology, join this walk exploring the route of Fulham Palace’s former moat – the longest domestic moat in England. Learn more on the theories of its origin and why it was infilled in the 1920s.

Photo of excavated moat

Fulham Palace Moat


The walk will be led by local expert Keith Whitehouse, who carried out the first sectional excavations of the moat for Fulham Archaeological Rescue Group in 1982.
Details
£5, accompanied children free
Booking essential, click here to book
Please meet by the fountain in the Tudor Courtyard


CATCH-UP FOR AGM AND DIARY

3 April, 2016

Sorry for the lack of posts recently but here is a catch up.

Palace Foreshores
We had a superb talk from Natalie Cohen from the Museum of London Archaeology about the work at the shoreline to record our past. It was both an enthusiastic and fascinating presentation do check the Newsletter for a fuller writeup.138 Spring 2016

The AGM will be on Tuesday at 7:30pm in St Clements Church Hall, again full details in the newsletter.

ENTRIES FOR YOUR DIARY
Tuesday 10 May at 7:30pm
PLAYED IN HAMMERSMITH AND FULHAM
Simon Inglis, who edits the Played in Britain series for English Heritage, offers a lively illustrated lecture on the surprisingly rich and varied sporting and recreational heritage of Fulham and Hammersmith. Here is athletics as described by Wilkie Collins at Lillie Bridge, billiards on Fulham Palace Road, skittles with AP Herbert at the Black Lion and a plasterer called Joseph Bickley, whose ‘secret formula’ had racket-wielding aristocrats queuing at his workshop on Lillie Road. We shall hear how a Scottish engineer nipped between Stevenage Road and Fulham Road during the summer of 1905 to build new stadiums for rivals Fulham and Chelsea, and how a squash court in
the grounds of Latymer School was one of seven sports-related buildings listed by English Heritage in 2014-15 as a result of Inglis’s latest, award winning book, Played in London – Charting the Heritage of a City at Play. https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/played-inlondon/. Also to be revealed is how, in 1878, a field in Fulham hosted what is thought to have been the first sporting event ever to have taken place under floodlights in Britain. If not interested in sport, don’t be put off. The evening’s focus is on architecture and social history, with some capital fun guaranteed.
Talk will be held in St Clements Church Hall (see details above under AGM)
Tuesday 14 June 7pm
FROM PALACE TO PRISON – A WALK AROUND FULHAM OLD TOWN
Fulham as well as a palace has a prison, some of the buildings still survive. We will look at the site of the wooden Fulham Bridge and the ferry crossing, where the first Mercedes cars in Britain were built, the temperance billiard hall now a pub, the Fulham war memorial garden where a plaque commemorates a Victoria Cross winner, the surviving kiln of Fulham Pottery, the road that gave its name to a lavatory system and much more. A walk not to be missed. Led by Keith Whitehouse.
Meet outside the Eight Bells pub, 89 Fulham High Street. near the river at 7pm
(one of Fulham’s oldest pubs that has stood here for over 400 years) and perhaps a drink afterwards.
Sunday 24th July 3-5pm
SUMMER TEAPARTY
Come and enjoy tea, cakes and conversation at 48 Peterborough Road, SW6 3EB on Sunday 24th July from 3 to 5pm the home of Sue and Lance Pierson. If it is fine we can spill into the garden. Parking is free. Parson’s Green is the nearest station a 10 to 15 minute walk away. Buses 28 and 295 go along the Wandsworth Bridge Road which is 5 minutes walk away. Number 48 is 2 doors from the junction with Daisy Lane.


PALACE FORESHORES

14 February, 2016

Tuesday 16 February 7:30pm
This talk by Nathalie Cohen Head of Community Archaeology at the Museum of London Archaeology ( http://www.mola.org.uk ) will discuss discoveries made during investigations by the Thames Discovery Programme on the inter-tidal zone in London, including Richmond, Fulham, the Tower of London and Greenwich. http://www.thamesdiscovery.org/ The Thames has been central to London and its development through the centuries. A fascinating subject and we are lucky to have Nathalie to present the discoveries; one not to be missed.
Place: St Clements Church Hall, Fulham Palace Road, SW6 (near corner of Crabtree Lane,) Buses 74, 220, 424, 430 (stop outside), 190, 211, 295, (stop nearby in Lillie Road).
Do tell friends and others who might be interested, all welcome FREE.


A Walk Around The Moat of Fulham Palace

26 March, 2014

Our Chairman Keith Whitehouse who directed the first archaeological excavations of the moat and Palace grounds in 1972-73 discovered a Romano-British settlement and prehistoric occupation as far back as 4000BC. A tour of the mile long circuit is an experience not to be missed.

Keith will lead the walk  beginning 1430 Sunday 30 Mar 14 at the Bishops Avenue entrance to Fulham Palace.  There will be a £5 donation to the Fulham Palace Trust towards the cost of an excavation in the Palace grounds later this year.

 


6 March, 2014

Museum of the Order of St John

Seven members/guests of the Society visited the Museum in Clerkenwell on Saturday, 22 February 2014. Most of us travelled to Farringdon Station, and negotiated our way around the hoardings above Crossrail’s excavations – part of Europe’s largest infrastructure project.

In the Crossrail Visitor Centre at Tottenham Court Road, for a month only to 15 March, a selection of archaeological finds from across the project are currently on display in its Portals to the Past exhibition.

But, that Saturday, we walked to another Gate, only five minutes away: St John’s Gate was the great south entrance to the Priory of Clerkenwell – founded in the early 1140s – outside the walls of the City of London. Now, it is the only gateway spanning a highway in London.

St John's Gate Clerkenwell dates to 1504

St John’s Gate taken by J B-D

At 11:30 am we met our Guide for an excellent private tour of the Grade 1 Listed buildings to discover the story of the former Priory and of the Order of St John from the 11th century to today’s role with St John Ambulance and the Eye Hospital in Jerusalem. As well as the 1504 Gate and its Towers, we saw the Tudor-style Chapter Hall, and Council Chamber. Crossing the busy Clerkenwell Road, we visited the Grand Priory Church, beside the herb garden – a quiet oasis.  Above ground, the Church is a post-war restoration following destruction of the roof and most of the interior fittings by a bomb in 1941. Beneath, is a remarkable Norman crypt: all that remains visible of the original Priory. Of the effigies, that of William Weston, Prior 1527-1540 – looking completely emaciated – was the most moving. Weston, we were told, was the last Prior of the Order at the time of its dissolution in England under Henry VIII, and died of a broken heart on the very day the act went through. The public Museum Rooms contain displays exploring further the fascinating history of the Order of St John.

This FHHS visit proved really worthwhile; thank you Keith.

Museum of Order of St John Website

By Jane B-D/4 Mar 14