131 2013 Summer/Autumn

No. 131 (Amended 22/8 /2013 ) NEWSLETTER SUMMER/AUTUMN 2013

PROGRAMME

VISITORS ARE WELCOME AT OUR MEETINGS

Tuesday, 6 August at 7p.m.

A WALK AROUND BROOK GREEN

A guided walk centred on the historic village of Brook Green that takes its name from a tributary of the Stamford Brook that flowed along the Green and across the Hammersmith Road, the Roman road to the west. It formed the boundary between Fulham and Hammersmith, known as Parr’s Ditch, and flowed into the the Thames just south of Chancellors Road. Famous residents include Gustav Holst who taught music at St Pauls Girls School, Frank Short the artist and engraver and Sir Henry Irving the actor.

Meet outside St Paul’s Park, Hammersmith Road opposite Brook Green.

Buses 9,10 & 27 stop opposite.

Tuesday, 17 September at 7p.m.

MR GUY’S HOSPITAL AND THE CARIBBEAN

Jane Bowden-Dan’s illustrated talk will explore medical links between the Caribbean and London that throw important light on the position of blacks in 18th century British society. Business letters of the Lascelles sugar merchants, describing the admission of ‘Negro Sampson’ for treatment by the surgeon Mr Samuel Sharp(e), point to intriguing early connections between Guy’s Hospital and the West Indies. Jane will refer to another Sharp – Granville Sharp, a Fulham resident – who fought for the abolition of the British Transatlantic Slave Trade, as did the Bishop of London, Beilby Porteus, who lived at Fulham Palace.

Place:- St Clements Church Hall, Fulham Palace Road, SW6 (near corner of Crabtree Lane) Buses: 74, 220, 424, 430 (stop outside), 190,211,295, (stop nearby in Lillie Road).

REFRESHMENTS BEFORE AND AFTERWARDS

Wednesday, 23 October at 12p.m. & 1.30p.m.

VISIT TO CROYDON PALACE AND CROYDON PARISH CHURCH

Croydon Palace was the summer residence of the Archbishops of Canterbury for over 500 years. The present buildings date back to the 15th century and are similar to Fulham Palace but retain many early architectural features unlike Fulham. It was disposed of in the early 19th century and replaced by Addington Palace. It is now the Old Palace School. Our guided tour includes the Great Hall, Guardroom and Chapel.

Tour lasts 2 hours including tea and cake in the Great Hall included in price of the tour.

Croydon Parish Church dates back to Saxon times. The present church was severely damaged by fire in 1867 and was rebuilt by Sir George Gilbert Scott. It still retains features from the earlier church including the tower. Six Archbishops of Canterbury are buried there including two former Bishops of London, Edmund Grindal and Gilbert Sheldon.

Meet at Croydon Church, Church Road (12pm) for a visit then make you own arrangements for lunch. Pubs and cafes nearby.

Those who just wish to visit the Palace meet at the entrance in Old Palace Road no later than 1.30p.m.

£7 concessions £6 (includes tea)

Take tram from Wimbledon Station alight at Church Street stop (opposite the end of Old Palace Road). The Palace is situated behind the Church in Old Palace Road (which is off Church Street – the Gun Tavern is on the corner.

Saturday, 16 November at 10.30a.m.

PRIVATE TOUR OF THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL

Limited to 15 places. To secure you place email Sue Pierson on sue@lancepierson.org or phone 020 7731 6544 as soon as possible.

Payment due 16 October. £8.50 per person

REVIEW OF EVENTS

Thursday, 11 April ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Two new members were elected to the Committee, Jane Bowden-Dan and John Hampshire. John will look after our website. Let him have your email if you have not already done so.

After the AGM., Barry Le Jeune, Chairman of the London Transport Museum Friends gave a fascinating talk on the “’The 150th anniversary of the London Underground commenced in 1863”.

Saturday, 18 May VISIT to WILLIAM MORRIS GALLERY, WALTHAMSTOW

A small group of seven turned up for the visit to Water House, home of the teenage William Morris, his widowed mother and eight siblings, set in the grounds of Lloyd Park. This utterly charming Grade 2* listed Georgian building is a short walk from Walthamstow Central on the Victoria line. It offers in its refurbished award winning form, (complete with new tasteful extension for an excellent café) an insight into the life, achievements and workings of the mind of William Morris, the Arts and Crafts Movement and its associates and his friend Burne-Jones. The galleries also display a rotating exhibition from the Brangwyn bequest and the most comprehensive collection of wallpapers, textiles and furniture made by the short-lived Century Guild of Artists founded by the architect Arthur Mackmurdo. Galleries set the scene for Morris’s life and show the influence of the Pre-Raphaelites and the shop Morris and Co. The Workshop displays details of weaving, colour dying, furniture, examples of pattern books and deals with his move towards Socialist views. Examples of printed works from the Kelmscot Press, are displayed – many in map cases. Some interesting examples of stained glass and the “Hammersmith Carpet” can also be seen. All these artefacts are supported by interactive objects, learning and research facilities which has led to the Gallery being named as Art Fund Museum of the year for 2013. William Morris in 50 objects (£7.50), with excellent A5 plates, offers a reasonably priced reminder of this display of his life, works and materials.

Wednesday, 12 June A WALK AROUND WALHAM GREEN

The Chairman conducted a party of 12 around the village of Walham Green now better known as Fulham Broadway on a wet evening.

The first recorded mention of Walham Green is in 1383. The origin of the name is uncertain but may refer to the Wenden family who were living in the area during the late 13th century. The village green is where Barclays Bank now stands and was first built on by St John’s School in 1836. Then replaced by the Granville Theatre music hall in 1898 controversially demolished in 1971. The village pond 

was on the site of St John’s Church infilled in 1814. Originally fed by a natural stream that flowed across Eelbrook Common and down Bagley’s Lane towards the Thames. Eelbrook is nothing to do with eels but in medieval times was Hillbrook due to the elevated ground here. The church, with a burial ground, was built in 1828 to serve the growing population.

Most of the pubs can be traced back to the 17th/18th centuries including the Swan (Brogans), Kings Head, Jolly Maltsters (The Malthouse), Cock and the Red Lion (The Slug). The White Hart, next to the Town Hall, and the George have recently closed down.

The underground was extended here from West Brompton in 1880 and the station was called Walham Green. The name was changed to Fulham Broadway in 1952 as the Fulham Chamber of Commerce thought the name sounded too rural for a shopping centre. The Fulham Town Hall was built in 1890. Further along the Fulham Road is the Sir Oswald Stoll Foundation. Known as the War Seal

The Fulham Road probably owes its origin to a prehistoric trackway that led to the ford near Putney Bridge and may have become a Roman road. The crossing of the railway line to Chelsea was formerly the Chelsea Creek. The name Stamford Bridge means stone paved ford, similar to Stamford Brook where the Roman road forded the Brook. The rain eventually abated and all the party stayed to the end.

2013 SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE NOW DUE

Could members who have NOT YET PAID their 2013 subscriptions please send them to:- Jo Brock, Flat 12, 43 Peterborough Road, London, SW6 3BT. The rates are:- Individual £8 Senior Citizens £5. Cheques payable to “The Fulham & Hammersmith Historical Society”. Please enclose a SAE if a receipt is required.

PRESS OFFICER

We are still in great need of a Press Officer who can supply information to local newspapers.This not a too onerous task. If interested please contact the Chairman Keith Whitehouse on 020 7385 3723.

 ARE YOU ON E-MAIL?

If you have an email address we could tell you about events and send you reminders of talks and outings. Send your email details to John Hampshire who has kindly agreed to collate them at john@jandahampshire.plus.com

Please visit our web site www.fhhs.org.uk for membership information

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: